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About Us

About the Northcentral University Library, it's services, staff, and available resources

Academic Libraries

Access to an academic library provides an important resource for your study at Northcentral University. Academic collections support higher-level education. Most university libraries allow any users to browse the collection, make photocopies and access online databases in house for free. Some public-funded and private universities will issue a library card to a non-affiliated individual or a local business with a fee. The library card for a non-affiliated community member also has more limited privileges that usually include book loan and article photocopies only, no interlibrary loan or remote access to databases.

Some academic libraries may even allow checkout privileges with proof that you are a student. NCU provides students with an ID card upon request. You may request an ID card via your Academic Advisor, or by sending a request to idcard@ncu.edu.

Public Libraries

Access to a public library provides an important resource for your study at Northcentral University. In the U.S., public libraries allow any patron to borrow through interlibrary loan, provide borrowing privileges from their collection, make photocopies and access online databases in house or via the Internet. The public library may be part of a larger network of libraries that may include colleges and universities.

Someone in a rural area may be able to obtain a public library card from a close metropolitan library, community college, or a county library with no or low cost in order to access online databases via the Internet.

Special Libraries

Special libraries cover a specific discipline or serve a special group of people.

Examples of special libraries include corporate libraries, law libraries (affiliated to law firms or courts), medical libraries (affiliated to medical research center or hospitals), libraries of advocacy organizations, professional associations, research centers, etc. Although only a few special libraries are open to the public, they can provide more in-depth information on their specialized subjects than other types of libraries.

Usually, if you are a member of a professional association or employee of a bigger company, you will have access to its special library. The reference librarians who oversee these libraries are generally very knowledgeable, and therefore a great resource.